Archive for August, 2013

Slowest Start To A Hurricane Season On Record

Posted in General Discussion on August 25, 2013 by McKinley Pitts

From Real Science Blog…

Real Science

Obama says that hurricanes are getting worse, based on some research done at the Choom Climatological Institute.

As we approach the end of August, there have been no Atlantic hurricanes. By this date in the year 1886, there had already been seven hurricanes – including three major hurricanes, one of which wiped the city of Indianola, Texas off the map.

ScreenHunter_357 Aug. 24 09.14

1886 Atlantic hurricane season – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A kinder, gentler natural hurricane from 1886

ScreenHunter_359 Aug. 24 09.46

Obama’s presidency has also seen the fewest US hurricane landfalls of any president. Three hurricanes have hit the US while he was in office, compared to twenty-six while Grover Cleveland was in office.

ScreenHunter_19 May. 08 06.04

Chronological List of All Hurricanes

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I COMMAND You to Read The Fortunes of Permanence by Roger Kimball.

Posted in General Discussion with tags , on August 20, 2013 by McKinley Pitts

I’m having a hard time sticking with books here lately for some reason. (Age!) One I am enjoying, however, is The Fortunes of Permanence by Roger Kimball. Stellar.

Jay Nordlinger’s five part review in NRO (the review is great!):

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/347406/important-part-i
http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/347538/important-part-ii
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/347605/important-part-iii
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/347791/important-part-iv
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/347834/important-part-v

Roger’s Rules » Bright Spots in the Bubble: The Case of St. John’s College

Posted in Higher Education with tags on August 20, 2013 by McKinley Pitts

“There is something curiously pregnant about silence among a small group of people sitting around a table, especially when they are confronted with a question. Thirty seconds seems like a long time. A minute is nearly unbearable.”

via Roger’s Rules » Bright Spots in the Bubble: The Case of St. John’s College.

Roger Kimball: Roger’s Rules

Posted in Big Government on August 19, 2013 by McKinley Pitts

Quote: How does despotism come to a modern democracy? Tocqueville thought it was by means of the regulatory state, which “extends its arms over society as a whole.”

[I]t covers its surface with a network of small, complicated, painstaking, uniform rules through which the most original minds and the most vigorous souls cannot clear a way to surpass the crowd; . . . it does not tyrannize, it hinders, compromises, enervates, extinguishes, dazes, and finally reduces each nation to being nothing more than a herd of timid and industrious animals of which the government is the shepherd.

via Roger’s Rules.

From The American Spectator : Sex and the Psychotic Professor

Posted in Big Government, Higher Education on August 19, 2013 by McKinley Pitts

“We are not converts of Rousseau; we are not disciples of Voltaire. Atheists are not our preachers; madmen are not our lawgivers.” What Burke said of England in 1790 cannot be said of America in 2013, where atheists and madmen and the disciples of radical philosophers hold high office and other positions of prestige.

via The American Spectator : Sex and the Psychotic Professor.

Cranmer: Christians are being slaughtered by Wahhabi Islamists all over the world: who is their Stephen Fry?

Posted in Christianity, Faith on August 18, 2013 by McKinley Pitts

Cranmer: Christians are being slaughtered by Wahhabi Islamists all over the world: who is their Stephen Fry?.

Benjamin Disraeli

Posted in First Things with tags on August 18, 2013 by McKinley Pitts

I am a Conservative to preserve all that is good in our constitution, a Radical to remove all that is bad. I seek to preserve property and to respect order, and I equally decry the appeal to the passions of the many or the prejudices of the few.

Benjamin Disraeli KG, PC, FRS, Earl of Beaconsfield. (Prime Minister, Great Britain 1868, 1874-1880)

via Cranmer.